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Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

7 edition of The American Indian ghost dance, 1870 and 1890 found in the catalog.

The American Indian ghost dance, 1870 and 1890

an annotated bibliography

by Shelley Anne Osterreich

  • 291 Want to read
  • 30 Currently reading

Published by Greenwood Press in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Great Plains
    • Subjects:
    • Ghost dance -- Bibliography.,
    • Indian dance -- Great Plains -- Bibliography.,
    • Indians of North America -- Great Plains -- Religion -- Bibliography.,
    • Indians of North America -- Great Plains -- History -- 19th century -- Bibliography.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes indexes.

      Statementcompiled by Shelley Anne Osterreich.
      SeriesBibliographies and indexes in American history,, no. 19
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsZ1209.2.U52 G757 1991, E98.D2 G757 1991
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxiv, 96 p. ;
      Number of Pages96
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1530557M
      ISBN 10031327469X
      LC Control Number91007957

      Get this from a library! The Lakota ghost dance of [Rani-Henrik Andersson] -- "A broad range of perspectives from Natives and non-Natives makes this book the most complete account and analysis of the Lakota ghost dance ever published. A revitalization movement that swept.   This innovative cultural history examines wide-ranging issues of religion, politics, and identity through an analysis of the American Indian Ghost Dance movement and its significance for two little-studied tribes: the Shoshones and Bannocks. The Ghost Dance has become a metaphor for the death of American Indian culture, but as Gregory Smoak argues, it was not the desperate fantasy of .

      The Ghost-Dance Religion and the Sioux Outbreak of , James Mooney; University of Nebraska Press, pg. 2. ibid. pg 3. A History of the Jews in Babylonia, Jacob Neusner. 4. American Indian Myths & Legends, Erodes and Ortiz; Pantheon, pg. . The Ghost Dance of was a more widespread spiritual movement that originated under the inspired leadership of the Numu (Northern Paiute) Indian Wovoka (Jack Wilson). The dance was taken up by a large number of Native American groups from the West Coast to the Great Plains.

      He left Washington in late to investigate the potentially incendiary Ghost Dance movement. In the winter of Mooney lived among the Cheyenne, Arapaho, Comanche, Wichita, and other Native Americans in Native American territory as they performed the Ghost Dance ritual, hoping to usher in the American Indian millennium.   The Ghost Dance was a religious dance that was practiced by the Sioux. This dance would lead to a massacre of over Native Americans. See the dance and learn more about the Massacre at Wounded.


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The American Indian ghost dance, 1870 and 1890 by Shelley Anne Osterreich Download PDF EPUB FB2

The American Indian Ghost Dance, and An Annotated Bibliography (Bibliographies and Indexes in American History) Hardcover – by Shelley Osterreich (Author) out of 5 stars 1 ratingCited by: 1.

The Ghost Dance Movements of and have fascinated historians, sociologists, and anthropologists since the time they first occurred. Embraced by American Indians of the Plains, Great Basin, and the Northwest Plateau, the religion of the Ghost Dance promised that all dead families and friends would return, the white men would disappear, and buffalo and other game would again roam.

The American Indian ghost dance, and an annotated bibliography. [Shelley Anne Osterreich] Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors: Shelley Anne Osterreich.

Find more information about: ISBN: X OCLC Number: Notes. The first Ghost Dance developed in around the dreamer Wodziwob (died c. ) and in –73 spread to California and Oregon tribes; it soon died out or was transformed into other cults. The second derived from Wovoka (c.

–), whose father, Tavibo, had assisted Wodziwob. Wovoka had been influenced by Presbyterians on whose ranch he worked, by Mormons, and by the Indian Shaker.

An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video. An illustration of an audio speaker. Audio An illustration of a " floppy disk.

The American Indian ghost dance, and an annotated bibliography Item Preview remove-circle Share or Pages: The Ghost Dance (Natdia) is a spiritual movement that came about in the late s when conditions were bad on Indian reservations and Native Americans needed something to give them hope.

This movement found its origin in a Paiute Indian named Wovoka, who announced that he was the messiah come to earth to prepare the Indians for their salvation.

The Paiute tradition that led to the Ghost. The s Ghost The American Indian ghost dance movement gradually subsided.

The second Ghost Dance movement () From vision to religion. Wovoka, a Paiute shaman (medicine man) who had participated in the Ghost Dance ofbecame ill with a fever late in and experienced a vision that provided part of the basis for the new Ghost Dance.

ByWovoka was speaking of the Ghost Dance bringing about the resurrection of their deceased ancestors. He also claimed that herds of buffalo would return in abundance, and that whites would not only leave, but would be annihilated by natural disasters, leaving Indians to their peaceful solitude once again.

In Novembera number of newspaper headlines across America linked the ghost dance to alleged plots against white settlers and U.S. Army troops. An example of how white society viewed the ghost dance appeared in the form of a lengthy story in the New York Times with the subheadline, "How the Indians Work Themselves Up to a Fighting Pitch.".

They reached deep into their faith and the second Ghost Dance appears. When the U.S. Government participate in the dance they panicked and the Wounded Knee Massacre occurred. The author took the telling of this story very seriously and researched widely including interviewing many Ghost s: 9.

In response to a vision, Wovoka () founded the Ghost Dance religion. A complex figure, he was revered by Indians while being denounced as an impostor and a lunatic by the local settlers throughout his entire life. Based on a personal vision, Wovoka created the Ghost Dance.

The Ghost Dance was a distinguishing phenomenon in Lakota history that caused a lot of friction and divisiveness among the Lakota people in From the very beginning, however, the Lakota Ghost Dance was studied mainly from the perspectives of white Americans, and the Lakota views were only in passing incorporated into this narrative.

This study of the and Ghost Dance movements among North American Indians offers an innovative theory about why these movements arose when they did. Emphasizing the demographic situation of American Indians prior to the movements, Professor Thornton argues that the Ghost Dances were deliberate efforts to accomplish a demographic revitalization of American Indians.

James Mooney wrote a book about the Ghost Dance, hoping it would help to counter newspaper articles about it that were inaccurate and promoted prejudice toward the Indians.

His research was first published as part of a report inthen enlarged as a book in The Ghost Dance, a messianic Native American religious movement, originated in Nevada aroundfaded, reemerged in its bestknown form in the winter of –89, then spread rapidly through much of the Great Plains, where hundreds of adherents died in the Wounded Knee Massacre.

The Ghost Dance The Ghost Dance by Cora Alice Du Bois. Download in PDF, EPUB, and Mobi Format for read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. The Ghost Dance books. Click Download for free ebooks. The Ghost Dance.

The Ghost Dance comes to a tragic end The Ghost Dance is often linked to Lakota resistance and the white Americans' fear of an Indian uprising. On Decemthis atmosphere of volatile distrust finally erupted in a bloody massacre - the Ghost Dance ended in tragedy at Wounded Knee.

The Ghost Dance. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. Mooney, James. The Ghost-Dance Religion and the Sioux Outbreak of Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Osterreich, Anne Shelley. The American Indian Ghost Dance, and An Annotated Bibliography. NY: Greenwood Press. Posting Date. Book Description: The Ghost Dance was a significant but too often disregarded transformative historical movement with particular impact on the Native peoples of northern California.

The spiritual energies of this "great wave," as Peter Nabokov has called it, have passed down to the present day among Native Californians, some of whose. Wounded Knee Massacre (Decem ), the slaughter of approximately – Lakota Indians by U.S.

Army troops in the area of Wounded Knee Creek in southwestern South Dakota. The massacre was the climax of the U.S. Army’s late 19th-century efforts to repress the Plains Indians. To assimilate Indians into American society, the Dawes Act did all of the following except.

outlaw the sacred Sun Dance. The United States government's outlawing of the Indian Sun (Ghost) Dance in resulted in the. Battle of Wounded Knee. The Dawes Severalty Act was designed to promote Indian. While all American Indian religions were already illegal, the American government specifically outlawed the Ghost Dance in and sent military units to the reservations to stop it.The Ghost Dance of and was a Native American world-renewal religion.

The religion took many forms, but its principal ideas were that the spirits of the dead would be raised, the buffalo would return, and European settlers would be driven away.